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Posts Tagged ‘Uncle Dave’s Ice Cream’

Bucks County Taste has moved! See this post on our new server. 

Ice creamEveryone has their favorite ice cream place. Usually it’s local, and maybe because it’s associated with sweetness and warm summer evenings, people tend to be fiercely loyal.

That’s why we are not going to rate ice cream purveyors in Bucks County (ha!), or even attempt to be comprehensive in our list. But for those of you interested in wandering the county, comparing vanillas, chocolates and peanut butter-chocolate-graham-whatever swirls, here’s a short list, starting in Upper Bucks and moving south. We did, however, skip franchise places, like Rita’s and Dairy Queen, as good as they might sometimes be.

Thanks to our new guest blogger, Rich Baringer, for his research in Upper Bucks, and to various other friends who have recommended their favorite places.

We hope to update this list as we get a chance to visit them, and add more information, so please let us know your favorite place, and why you love it. Send us an email, or drop a comment below.

Rosemarie’s Italian Ice (Quakertown), 304 W. Broad Street, (215) 536-3220
“A million flavors” of ice cream, plus water ice and gelato.

Grida’s (Richlandtown), 36 N. Main St, (215) 536-2691
Good old-fashioned walk-up food stand. Great place to hang with friends or pick up to take home. Locally owned for over forty years, with a big menu in addition to ice cream. Soft-serve dipped in chocolate is a favorite.

Banana SplitSundae School (Hilltown), 401 W. Schoolhouse Rd., (215) 723-4123‎
Housed in the old Pennview Schoolhouse – they even have the names and pictures of those who attended school there. Lots of Hershey’s ice cream flavors as well as smoothies, sundaes, Italian ice, candy, ice cream cakes, and chocolate covered bananas. Very friendly staff with an old-fashioned feel inside and outside seating for hanging out.

Owow Cow Creamery (Ottsville), at the intersection of Routes 536 & 412, near Rt. 611
All natural, organic, small batch, handcrafted ice cream, “Italian” style (think rich and dense) made on-site sourcing ingredients from local farms. Twenty flavors. Outside seating. Just imagine – you can eat healthy, great ice cream and support local farmers.

Chubby’s Dairy Barn (Plumsteadville), right behind the Plumsteadville Inn, near the intersection of Route 611 and Stump Road, 215.766.7554
Very family- and community-oriented (hosting Cruise nights, local kids sports teams, movie viewings, ice cream cookie nights), serving Nelson’s ice cream (from Royersford). Extremely friendly staff – even have treats for dogs who visit.

Del Val Creamery @ The Market  by Shady Brook Farm at Delaware Valley College (Doylestown), 2100 Lower State Road
Locally made by Uncle Dave’s ice cream  in Yardley (who also sells at Shady Brook Farm Market). Made from 100 percent super premium Jersey cow milk, from independently owned Pennsylvania dairy farms and using Shady Brook produce – like raspberries, strawberries and peaches – in the ice cream whenever possible. See our story on the Del Val Market.

Soft ice creamPigadilly’s (Lahaska) Peddler’s Village, Shop #53, 215.794.2122
Sixteen hard and nine soft-serve flavors, gelato, baked goods and other light food. Great Peanut Butter Swirl.

Dilly’s Corner (Centre Bridge), on River Road (Route 32), north of New Hope, right at the Centre Bridge-Stockton bridge
Another local favorite that has been there for years. Ice cream, milkshakes and a grill menu. Watch for our upcoming review.

Sweet Pea Creams & Confections (Newtown), 254 N. Sycamore St. (Goodnoe’s Corner), 215.968.0466
Own-make ice cream in 22 flavors, sundaes, ice cream sandwiches, ice cream cakes and pies, and homemade candies.

Goodnoe Farm Dairy Bar (Newtown) 4 South Sycamore Street, 215.968.3544
The tradition continues. Goodnoe’s was the place to go for ice cream for 40 years, back when Newtown was surrounded by farms. Now the next generation is making ice cream again, using the family recipes. The recently opened store sells their homemade hand-dipped ice cream in 12 flavors, offers 15 kinds of sundaes, and milkshakes.

Tanner Brothers Dairy (Ivyland/Richboro), 1070 Hatboro Road, 215-357-1716
Tanner’s had been in business for over 100 years as a working dairy farm so you know the ice cream is fresh. Their produce selection and prices are great too, year-round.

Uncle Dave’s (Yardley) at Shady Brook Farm,  931 Stony Hill Road, 215-968-1670
Locally made from 100 percent super premium Jersey cow milk, from independently owned Pennsylvania dairy farms and using Shady Brook produce – like raspberries, strawberries and peaches – in the ice cream whenever possible.

Ice cream floatYardley Ice House (Yardley boro), 77 S. Main St., 215.321.9788
Family-owned and run. Gourmet Italian Water Ice (in 22 flavors), gelati, soft serve custard, milk shakes and malts, ice cream sundaes, blend-ins and ice cream floats.

Dairy Delite (Levittown), 972 Woodbourne Rd, 215.547.1636‎
This hugely popular ice cream place has several locations in Lower Bucks. From what we’ve heard, portions are big and the lines are long. Thanks to Donnie at The Pineville for this tip. Gotta check it out.

And on the other side of the river…

It’s Nutts (Titusville), 1381 River Road, 609.737.0505
Convenient for Bucks County folks in Upper Makefield and Washington Crossing area. Good ice cream, interesting flavors, outside seating right off of River Road/Route 29.

See more local food stories at www.buckscountytaste.com

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Now that it’s up and running, it seems so natural. Two names – Delaware Valley College and Shady Brook Farm – both a part of Bucks County agricultural history.

The official opening of The Market by Shady Brook Farm at Delaware Valley College , or “The Market” for short, was in early April. We had the pleasure of sitting down with Dave Fleming, Jr., general manager of both the DelVal market in Doylestown and Shady Brook Farm’s market in Yardley.

sb-preservesA little history lesson. Shady Brook Farm started in 1913. Owner Dave Fleming, Sr., is an alumni of Delaware Valley College, and ran a traditional wholesale farming business until the mid-1980s.

“In 1984, we started seeing the writing on the wall,” explains the younger Fleming. The family realized that retail – not wholesale – was the way the business was going, and opened a farm market. Fleming took over the retail store when he graduated from college in 1990, while his brother, Paul, stayed on the production, or farming, side of the business.

In the mid-90’s, Fleming, Jr. decided it was time to go the next step. He wanted to do prepared foods in the market, but needed permission to install sewer and water to do so. Not always easy to accomplish in Bucks County. Fast forward twelve years and Shady Brook opened a new store in 2004, complete with kitchen, deli and bakery.

Next chapter. Delaware Valley College, known locally as “DelVal,” has been educating farmers, horticulturists and other ag types since 1896. (It also does more than teach agriculture these days. US News & World Report just ranked it as one of the best comprehensive colleges in the country). In 2004, the college, which had a modest farm market, built and opened a beautiful new market and garden center on Lower State Road. But things didn’t pan out and the market closed.

Determined to make it work, the college looked at other avenues. They hired a farm market consultant. He gave them the names of thirty markets to visit, plus the five he would recommend to run DelVal’s. One of which was Shady Brook.

cropped-dvc-spring-flowers.jpgWhy did they choose Shady Brook?  Don Feldscher, special assistant to DelVal President Dr. Joseph Brosnan, explains that Shady Brook had the right “feel.”

“They talked first about education, and using students to work in the market,” says Feldscher. The college also liked that Shady Brook was committed to using college produce and products.

Fleming also points to Shady Brook’s experience. “A lot of places do a farm market well, or a garden center well,” he explains, “it’s difficult to keep focus on both sides. We’ve had that experience.” Shady Brook also knew a thing or two about running successful events, as they have been doing for years at their Yardley farm. In addition, they are an Agway dealer, and sell all kinds of garden products, from pansies to trees.

But enough history. Let’s talk food! While the interior of the market hasn’t changed much – it’s still crisp, clean and bright – there are some notable changes, both out front and behind the scenes.

Prepared Foods. Shady Brook has hired two chefs and a pastry chef to run the kitchen, and they’re already turning out great food. Everything from breakfast sandwiches, to hot and cold sandwiches (hoagies, paninis, cheese steaks, burgers, hot sides), to soup, to hot entrees and sides for dinner.

The kitchen is still developing its “signature,” says Fleming. “We want to have a ‘country feel.’ We don’t want to get too high-end for a farm market.” The only goal, he says, is that it has to be “exceptional.” Shady Brook has brought many of its signature products from Yardley – like its guacamole, pico de gallo, honey, and peanut butter, as well as a whole line of gourmet preserves and canned goods. (They also plan to produce food in the DelVal kitchen to sell down in Yardley.)

DVC desserts

Bakery. “Yum,” is all I can say. Pastries, cookies, pies, cakes and bread. And a full coffee bar to go with it.

Produce. A wide selection of both regular and organic produce that will only get better as we move into spring and summer. Produce from both the college and Shady Brook Farm will fill the shelves. Look for the college’s tomatoes soon, then asparagus and field greens in May from Shady Brook.

Meat and dairy. Pork and beef raised at the college, Eberly’s organic chicken, Griggstown Market’s chicken pot pies, to name a few. Deli cold cuts by Dietz & Watson and Boar’s Head are also available by the pound. Dairy items too, including organic products.

Specialty items. The market carries a good selection of DiBruno’s (from South Philly) cheeses and salamis, as well as many gourmet grocery items. Shady Brook’s own guacamole is, indeed, “exceptional.”

del-val-creamery

Ice cream. Okay, so I saved the best for last. Those of you familiar with Shady Brook Farm probably also know Uncle Dave’s Ice Cream. Dave Adami, a childhood friend of Dave Fleming, Jr., started his ice cream company in March 2008.

Made from 100 percent super premium Jersey cow milk, from independently owned Pennsylvania dairy farms, it comes in, oh, about 50 or 60 flavors, including Billionaire Chocolate, Toasted Coconut and Graham Cracker. Dave uses Shady Brook produce – like raspberries, strawberries and peaches – in the ice cream whenever he can.  At the market you’ll see the ice cream sold under the Del Val Creamery brand. Grab some and have a seat in the spacious eating area inside the market.

Coming soon – wine. Rose Bank Winery, another Shady Brook Farm offshoot, will be opening a kiosk in the market as soon as the paperwork goes through.

I’m sure I’ve forgotten something – so you’ll have to drive over to the market and check it out for yourself. Just be sure to leave with some guacamole.

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DVC ProduceJust in time for Spring, the Del Val Farm Market has reopened its doors. The Market by Shady Brook Farm at Delaware Valley College will have its grand opening this weekend, Saturday, April 4th and Sunday, April 5th, with fun activities for kids and product samples for all visitors.

Shady Brook Farm  of Newtown is managing the market and gardening center, bringing together great produce, products and plants from both the College and Shady Brook’s farmland. In addition to fresh produce, dairy, local meats and prepared foods, there’s wonderful locally-produced ice cream by Uncle Dave’s Ice Cream.

We’ll share our interview with Dave Fleming, Jr., manager of both Shady Brook and Del Val Farm Markets, soon so stay tuned.

DVC desserts

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